Condominium Management
Regulatory Authority of Ontario

Complaints Process

The CMRAO works in the public interest to build trust in condominium management services across Ontario. Handling complaints is an integral part of consumer protection. The CMRAO’s complaints process examines instances and circumstances when licensees are alleged to have violated the Condominium Management Services Act, 2015 (CMSA), including the Code of Ethics regulation. The CMRAO works diligently to administer a fair and transparent complaints process.

INITIAL ASSESSMENT

10 business days

(may vary depending on nature of the complaint)

INFORMATION GATHERING

30 business days

(may vary depending on nature of the complaint)

REVIEW AND DECISION

20 business days

(may vary depending on nature of the complaint)

ENTIRE PROCESS

60 business days

(total duration of process)

 

JURISDICTION – “WHAT COMPLAINTS CAN THE CMRAO HANDLE?”

The CMRAO handles complaints against condominium managers and condominium management provider businesses pursuant to theCondominium Management Services Act, 2015 (CMSA) and its regulations, including a Code of Ethics regulation.

The CMRAO does not have jurisdiction over the decisions or conduct of the condominium corporation, other people, or businesses (such as the board of directors, administrators, security guards or others) unless they are providing condominium management services illegally without a licence or otherwise violating the CMSA.

The CMRAO can handle complaints about:

  • Providing condominium management services illegally without a licence
  • Providing condominium management services without a written contract or in a way that would contravene the contract
  • Not disclosing a conflict of interest in a contract or transaction to a client
  • Soliciting proxy forms in a way that would contravene section 53 of theCMSA
  • Non-compliance with section 54 of the CMSA to transfer records to a condominium corporation upon termination of a contract
  • Retaining a client’s records after termination of a contract as a means of pressuring a client to fulfill a contractual obligation
  • Non-compliance with the conditions of a person’s licence
  • Inadequate record-keeping, namely, not making or keeping records that would reasonably be required for the purposes of providing condominium management services
  • Not providing condominium management services in a financially responsible way
  • Failing to use best efforts to prevent error, misrepresentation, fraud or unethical practices
  • Failing to keep a client condominium corporation informed in a timely manner of all significant steps taken in the course of providing condominium management services
  • Failing to promote and protect the best interests of a client condominium corporation

The CMRAO does not have jurisdiction over and will not take action on complaints about:

  • Decisions made by the corporation’s board of directors, such as decisions about:
    • Monthly fees or other fees payable to the condominium corporation
    • Repairs, maintenance, or construction projects
    • Chargebacks applied to a unit
    • Registering a lien against a unit
    • Access to the corporation’s records
    • Other areas that fall under the purview of the condominium’s board of directors
  • The conduct of the condominium corporation’s board of directors
  • The conduct of staff or contractors of a condominium corporation, such as administrative personnel, security guards, superintendents, lawyers or auditors

If you have a complaint related to any of the above areas, you may wish to communicate your concerns to your condominium’s board of directors. It is common for boards to receive communications from owners through the condominium manager. You may also voice your concerns at your condominium corporation’s annual general meeting.

You may wish to seek legal advice or contact another appropriate organization. The Condominium Authority of Ontario (CAO) has a wealth of useful information and resources about condominium living and common issues available on their website. Additionally, the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT) currently accepts applications related to disputes about:

  • Condominium Records
  • Pets and animals
  • Vehicles
  • Parking and Storage
  • Settlement Agreements

Prior to submitting a compliant with the CMRAO, review our Types of complaints section to learn more about specific types of complaints and how the CMRAO may or may not be able to assist you. In many instances, it is appropriate to try to resolve a complaint locally by contacting the condominium manager prior to submitting a complaint with the CMRAO. Filing a complaint with the CMRAO is a serious action with potential legal consequences and all parties are expected to act in good faith throughout the complaints process.

Types of Complaints

The CMRAO takes complaints seriously by investigating possible breaches of the Code of Ethics and offences under the Condominium Management Services Act, 2015. However, not all complaints received are within the CMRAO’s jurisdiction. The CMRAO handles very specific types of complaints.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Condominium managers and management providers play an important role in protecting the financial well-being of a condominium corporation. One of the most fundamental aspects of a condominium manager or management provider’s role is to collect contributions to the common expenses or other amounts levied by, or payable to, the corporation. Management has a responsibility to act in the best interest of the condominium corporation, which includes taking appropriate actions when owners do not pay their contributions to the common expenses.

The condominium corporation’s Board of Directors oversees the manager and management provider and is responsible for evaluating whether a licensee has fulfilled their contractual obligations with regards to managing the corporation’s finances.

The Code of Ethics regulation requires that all licensees be financially responsible in providing condominium management services. If the corporation’s Board of Directors has formed the opinion that a licensee has failed to fulfill their contractual and ethical obligations, they may submit a complaint to the CMRAO.

Complaints of this nature should include specific details and documentation relating to how the licensee failed to fulfill their contractual obligations and, where applicable, a description of the impact on the condominium corporation.

The Code of Ethics regulation also requires that licensees demonstrate reasonable competence in providing condominium management services. The CMRAO has identified 9 competencies with respect to financial management. These competencies apply to managers who hold a General Licence with the CMRAO. A person who holds a General Licence is generally be expected to be able to:

  1. Prepare, present and implement the annual budgets
  2. Collect the common expenses
  3. Interpret financial statements and explain variances to the Board of Directors to enable informed decisions
  4. Monitor financial status and report concerns to the Board of Directors
  5. Monitor Reserve Fund spending and balance relative to the Reserve Fund Study
  6. Support the Board of Directors in the Reserve Fund investment process
  7. Support the annual financial audit process
  8. Review the general ledger to ensure accurate expense reporting
  9. Implement the financial controls to protect the condominium corporation’s financial assets

Ultimately, the services that a licensee provides to the condominium corporation must be provided in accordance with the contract with the corporation. Depending on the nature of the contract, these competencies may be considered in the CMRAO’s complaint evaluation process.

The CMRAO does not have jurisdiction over disputes about financial decisions made by the condominium corporation’s board of directors, such as decisions about monthly fees or special assessments.

PAYMENT DISPUTES

The CMRAO does not have jurisdiction over disputes about payments between a condominium owner and a condominium corporation.

Owners are required to pay their common expense fees on time. One of the most fundamental aspects of a condominium manager or management provider’s role is to collect contributions to the common expenses or other amounts levied by, or payable to, the corporation. Management has a responsibility to act in the best interest of the condominium corporation, which includes taking appropriate actions when owners do not pay their contributions to the common expenses. When an owner defaults on their contributions to the common expenses, the corporation automatically has a lien against the unit for the amount owing, plus interest, plus reasonable legal costs and expenses related to collection of the unpaid amount.

Management has a responsibility to promote and protect the best interest of the corporation and, therefore, when an owner defaults on their contributions to the common expenses, it is important that management identify the situation and take appropriate actions in order to protect the best interest of the condominium corporation.

 

Monthly contributions to common expenses

Collecting monthly contributions to the common expenses is a standard operating procedure for the management provider within a condominium corporation. If your unit is in arrears for failing to pay monthly contributions and you believe this is a mistake, you should raise the issue with your manager to try to resolve the issue. If you are unable to resolve the issue and you have documentation that demonstrates that your unit is in arrears due to an error by the management provider—for example, the licensee failed to process a preapproved automatic payment or did not properly account for your contributions—you may wish to file a complaint with the CMRAO.

Complaints of this nature should include relevant supporting documentation, such as bank statements and copies of communications with the licensee.

 

Chargebacks

In addition to collecting monthly contributions to the common expenses, management is typically expected to implement “chargebacks” to a unit owner’s account in accordance with the Condominium Act, 1998. A chargeback is an amount added to a unit owner’s common expenses which typically arises as the result of an act or omission on the part of an owner. Because chargebacks form part of the unit’s common expenses, defaulting on a chargeback is treated the same way as defaulting on monthly contributions to the common expenses.

If an owner is issued a chargeback, it is reasonable for the owner to expect management to be able to provide an explanation of the chargeback and how it was implemented in accordance with the Condominium Act. If an owner does not understand why they have been issued a chargeback, they should contact the manager and ask for clarification. If an owner does not receive a response within a reasonable period of time, the owner may submit a complaint to the CMRAO.

If the CMRAO receives a complaint from an owner in relation to a chargeback, the CMRAO will review the complaint to assess whether the licensee has provided responsive service to the owner, and demonstrated reasonable knowledge and competence with respect to administering the chargeback. The CMRAO may attempt to resolve the complaint by facilitating communication between the owner and the licensee or engaging the condominium corporation’s Board of Directors, as appropriate.

The CMRAO cannot legally determine if a chargeback has been implemented in accordance with the Condominium Act, and regardless of the outcome of the complaint, the CMRAO cannot overturn a chargeback or remove a registered lien.

REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE

Although condominium managers are often tasked with managing the maintenance and repair obligations of the condominium corporation, the condominium corporation’s Board of Directors is responsible for making decisions about repairs and maintenance and ensuring that required repairs and maintenance activities are carried out.

A licensee who has a contractual obligation to manage, maintain, repair or protect the property or the assets, if any, of a client has an obligation to:

  • be diligent in executing these obligations, and
  • keep their client informed in a timely manner of information about the condition of the property or assets.

Condominium Corporations

The condominium corporation’s Board of Directors oversees the manager and management provider and would be responsible for evaluating whether a licensee has fulfilled their contractual obligations with regards to managing the maintenance and repair obligations of the corporation.

If the corporation’s Board of Directors forms the opinion that a licensee has failed to fulfill their contractual and ethical obligations, they may submit a complaint to the CMRAO.

Complaints of this nature should include:

  • An explanation of how the manager failed to fulfill the terms of their contract and manage the corporation’s repair and maintenance obligations
  • A description of the impact on the condominium corporation and other relevant parties
  • Excerpts of specific sections of the corporation’s governing documents that pertain to the item(s) in question
  • Copies of any communication with the manager regarding the repair or maintenance item(s)
  • Copies of board meeting minutes related to the repair or maintenance item(s) in question 

Condominium Owners

Owners can generally expect their manager to provide them with information about a repair or maintenance item. The manager should be able to explain who is responsible for a repair and why.

If the CMRAO receives a complaint from an owner in relation to a repair or maintenance item, the CMRAO will review the complaint to assess whether the licensee has provided responsive service to the owner, and demonstrated reasonable knowledge and competence with respect to the item. The CMRAO will attempt to resolve the complaint by facilitating communication between the owner and the licensee, or engaging the condominium corporation’s Board of Directors, as appropriate.

The CMRAO cannot legally determine whether an owner or the condominium corporation is responsible for a repair and cannot force the condominium corporation to conduct or prioritize any repair or maintenance item.

CONDOMINIUM CORPORATION RECORDS

Condominium owners have the right to access certain records of the corporation. If an owner would like to request access to, or copies of, corporation records, they must use the mandatory Request for Records form, which can be submitted to their manager.

For more information about accessing a condominium corporation’s records, please visit the Condominium Authority of Ontario’s website, which includes the Request for Records form, information about the types of records that an owner has the right to access, legal considerations, solutions, and access to the Condominium Authority Tribunal, where you can file a case regarding a dispute about a request for records.

In accordance with their contract, management providers can be expected to manage the corporation’s records in accordance with applicable legislation. This includes keeping adequate records defined under the Condominium Act, such as financial records of the corporation, copies of the corporation’s governing documents and copies of all agreements entered into by or on behalf of the corporation and ensuring that these records are kept for the prescribed period of time.

The Condominium Management Services Act, 2015 (CMSA) has specific provisions about maintenance and client access to condominium corporation records. Section 6 of Ontario Regulation 4/18 states that a licensee who holds records on behalf of a condominium corporation shall:

  1. ensure that the records are maintained securely, accurately, and with care and due regard for the client’s obligations under section 55 of the Condominium Act, 1998;
  2. upon request by the client condominium corporation, make the records available for inspection by the client as soon as reasonably possible; and
  3. at the request of a client condominium corporation, transfer to the client any records held by the licensee, or a copy of the records, as soon as reasonably possible.

The CMSA also includes specific provisions about the turnover of records when a management agreement (contract) is terminated.

Section 54 of the CMSA requires that “Subject to the regulations … every licensee that provides condominium management services to a client shall immediately transfer to the client all documents and records relating to the client upon termination of any contract for the condominium management services provided.”

Section 35 of the General Regulation (O. reg 123/17) expands on section 54 of the CMSA and states that licensees are required to transfer documents and records to their client no later than 15 days upon termination of a management contract. If a document or record does not exist at the time that the contract is terminated, licensees shall create, copy, and transfer the record to the client no later than 30 days after termination of the contract.

Licensees should also consider their ethical obligation to act in the best interest of their clients. Ideally, there should be a smooth transition from one manager to the next. It is common for boards to instruct the outgoing management company to transfer records directly to the incoming management company.

While the General Regulation gives licensees 15 days to transfer records upon termination of a contract, it is often reasonable for this process to begin before the contract is officially terminated. It may also be considered a professional courtesy among licensed condominium managers and management companies to transfer documents and records sooner than the legislated 15-day requirement.

Also note that the CMSA allows licensees to make and retain a copy of a document or record if required for purposes relating to the contract for condominium management services. However, licensees shall not retain any documents or records relating to the client as a means of pressuring the client to fulfill contractual obligations to the licensee.

If the corporation’s Board of Directors or an incoming management provider business has formed the opinion that a licensee has failed to fulfill their contractual, legal, or ethical obligations with regards to records management or turnover of records, they may submit a complaint to the CMRAO.

For more information about management’s responsibilities with regards to records management, please review Guide for Licensees: Records Management for Condo Managers.

ELECTION OF BOARD MEMBERS

The CMRAO does not have jurisdiction over the results of a condominium corporation’s elections.

The role of condominium managers and condominium management provider businesses is to be neutral administrators of the meeting notice, proxy, and election processes. Licensees must understand and adhere to the requirements established in legislation, regulation, and the corporation’s by-laws, declaration, and rules. Licensees should not put their own interests above the need for open, fair, and legal processes even when asked or directed otherwise.

In circumstances where the condominium manager takes on the role of chairing a meeting of owners, the manager should be aware that the chair is accountable to all owners.

The CMSA includes specific provisions about management’s involvement in the use of proxy forms for voting and election purposes. Section 53 of the CMSA states that:

A licensee, or any person acting on behalf of a licensee, shall not solicit an instrument appointing a proxy for a meeting of owners where the subject matter of the meeting includes:

  1. any matter directly related to the licensee,
  2. the removal or the election of one or more of the directors of the client, or
  3. any other prescribed matter.

Section 33 of the General Regulation (O. reg 123/17) then expands on section 53 of the CMSA and states that:

  1. In section 53 of the Act, “solicit” means to petition for, or to try to directly obtain, an instrument appointing a proxy, but does not include:
    1. collecting or holding instruments appointing a proxy or providing a location in which the instruments can be collected or held respectively,
    2. notifying or reminding owners or mortgagees to submit instruments appointing a proxy if the owners or mortgagees respectively are unable to attend a meeting of owners,
    3. making information available on how to submit an instrument appointing a proxy,
    4. providing a form of an instrument appointing a proxy as part of anything that a client gives to owners or mortgagees, or
    5. providing a copy of a form described in clause (d) to owners or mortgagees on request.
  2. A licensee shall not modify or attempt to modify an instrument appointing a proxy for a meeting of owners.
  3. A licensee or any person acting on behalf of a licensee is exempt from section 53 of the Act if the licensee or the person, as the case may be, solicits an instrument appointing a proxy for a meeting of owners where the form or content of the instrument does not authorize or require the proxy to vote on any matter at the meeting, including matters of routine procedure.

For more information about management’s responsibilities with regards to the use of proxy forms, please review the CMRAO’s Guide for Licensees: The Use of Proxies and Proxy Forms.

If you have documented evidence showing that a licensee has failed to comply with their contractual, legal, or ethical obligations with regards to the solicitation of proxy forms, you may wish to submit a complaint the CMRAO.

Complaints of this nature should include:

  • Copies of any available proxy forms that are relevant to the complaint
  • An explanation of how the licensee failed to meet their obligations
  • Copies of any communications with the licensee regarding the allegation that led to the complaint

BOARD OF DIRECTORS DECISIONS

Condominium managers and management provider businesses operate under the terms of a contract with the condominium corporation. The corporation is represented by its Board of Directors, which is responsible for transacting the business of the corporation. A condominium’s Board of Directors will make decisions with regards to maintenance fees, reserve fund contributions, special assessments, prioritization of repairs, payment disputes, selection of contractors/vendors and other matters pertaining to the business of the corporation.

Management is expected to advise the Board of Directors in making informed decisions in the best interest of the condominium and to implement the Board’s decisions.

The CMRAO does not have jurisdiction over the decisions of a condominium corporation’s Board of Directors.

If you have a complaint related to a decision of your condominium’s Board of Directors, you should communicate your concerns to the Board. It is common for boards to receive communications from owners through the condominium manager. You may also voice your concerns at your condominium corporation’s annual general meeting.

You may also wish to seek legal advice or information from the Condominium Authority of Ontario (CAO), which has useful resources about condominium living and common issues available on their website. Additionally, the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT) currently accepts applications related to disputes about:

  • Condominium Records
  • Pets and animals
  • Vehicles
  • Parking and Storage
  • Settlement Agreements

UNLICENSED PRACTICE

Condominium corporations may hire a condominium management provider business or condominium manager to oversee the corporation’s day-to-day operations. Under the Condominium Management Services Act, 2015 (CMSA), individuals and businesses that provide condominium management services in Ontario must hold a licence issued by the CMRAO, unless exempt under regulation.

Under the Condominium Management Services Act (CMSA), “condominium management services” means any of the following services provided to, or on behalf of, a condominium corporation:

  1. Collecting or holding contributions to the common expenses or other amounts levied by, or payable to, the corporation.
  2. Exercising delegated powers and duties of the corporation or its Board of Directors, including:
    1. making payments to third parties on behalf of the corporation,
    2. negotiating or entering into contracts on behalf of the corporation, or
    3. supervising employees or contractors hired or engaged by the corporation.

For more information about who requires a licence, please review Do I Need a Licence? Interpreting the Definition of Condominium Management Services. The guide provides helpful information that helps to distinguish between management services (that require a licence) and administrative services that do not.

While the CMRAO’s jurisdiction is limited to enforcing provisions under the CMSA, it is worth noting that a condominium corporation should only hire a person to provide condominium management services if that person is properly licensed by the CMRAO. Section 17.0.1 of the Condominium Act, 1998 states “A corporation shall not enter into an agreement with a condominium management provider or a condominium manager to receive condominium management services unless the provider or manager, as the case may be, is licensed under the Condominium Management Services Act, 2015.

If you have information about an individual or business that is providing condominium management services illegally without a licence, you are encouraged to file a complaint with the CMRAO.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

The condominium corporation’s Board of Directors oversees the manager and management provider and is responsible for evaluating whether a licensee has fulfilled any contractual obligations with regards to managing safety and security at the corporation.

Owners may observe health and safety hazards within a condominium community, and it is appropriate to raise these issues with the condominium manager. Owners should expect licensees to be reasonably responsive in handling certain safety concerns. In the event of an emergency, owners should contact other authorities as appropriate.

The Code of Ethics regulation requires that licensees demonstrate reasonable competence in providing condominium management services. The CMRAO has identified several competencies with respect to safety and security procedures that can be expected of a manager who holds a General Licence. A person who holds a General Licence is generally be expected to be able to:

  • Implement and update the corporation’s Fire Safety Plan
  • Manage health and safety compliance requirements
  • Recognize, act on, and report actual and potential workplace and occupational safety risks to the corporation’s Board of Directors
  • Assist in the development and implementation of emergency procedures
  • Recognize, act on, and report harmful incidents to the appropriate authority

Ultimately, the services that a licensee provides to the condominium corporation must be provided in accordance with the contract with the corporation. Depending on the nature of the contract, these competencies may be considered in the CMRAO’s review of any complaints related to safety and security concerns.

PRIVACY

Many aspects of a condominium manager’s job require that they manage or come into contact with personal or private information. For example, condominium managers are typically involved in managing the corporation’s records, handling complaints/inquiries from owners, and entering owners’ units.

The Code of Ethics regulation requires that, except as is otherwise authorized or required by law, a licensee shall not disclose to a third party any confidential information without prior written consent of the person to whom the information relates. The Code of Ethics also requires that licensees demonstrate reasonable competence in providing condominium management services. A person who holds a General Licence would generally be expected to be able to maintain privacy and confidentiality involving condominium corporation matters as per legislation.

If you have reason to believe that a licensee has disclosed confidential information to a third party without prior written consent, you may wish to file a complaint with the CMRAO. Depending on the nature of the concern, you may also wish to attempt to resolve the concern locally before raising a formal complaint with the CMRAO.

 
 

STAGES OF THE COMPLAINT PROCESS

STAGE 1 – INITIAL ASSESSMENT

After your complaint is received, it will be assigned to a coordinator who will review the submission and contact you within 5business days with an update about your complaint.

In the initial assessment stage, complaints are reviewed by the CMRAO to determine if the complaint falls within its jurisdiction. The CMRAO will close complaint files that do not fall within its jurisdiction or that are not of regulatory concern and will email a formal letter to the complainant, outlining reasons for the case closure.

If it is determined that the complaint falls within the CMRAO’s jurisdiction and is of regulatory concern, then the complaint will move to theInformation Gathering stage.

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SERVICE STANDARDS:

  • Complainants will receive an automated email confirming that the CMRAO has received their complaint
  • Complainants will be contacted by a coordinator within 5 business days of submitting their complaint
  • A decision about whether the complaint will move to the next stage should be issued to the complainant within10 business days of the complaint being submitted

STAGE 2 – INFORMATION GATHERING

The CMRAO will proceed with gathering additional information from the licensee and/or other individuals, as necessary. Although most complaints involve only the CMRAO, the complainant, and the licensee, the CMRAO may also need to involve other individuals in the complaints process, such as members of the condominium corporation’s board of directors.

During this stage, the coordinator will contact the licensee to request information related to the complaint, at which point they will disclose the nature of the complaint to the licensee. The coordinator may contact the licensee over the phone or request information in writing.

It is common for the coordinator to call the licensee when the initial assessment indicates that facilitating communication between the complainant and the licensee may be helpful in handling the complaint.

If the coordinator requests information from the licensee in writing, the licensee will typically be given 4 weeks to provide a response. The CMSA requires that “a licensee who receives a written request for information shall provide the information as soon as practicable.” If the licensee is employed by a condominium management provider business, then a copy of the request for information will be given to the Principal Condominium Manager of the provider.

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SERVICE STANDARDS:

  • The CMRAO will complete the Information Gathering Stage of the complaints process within 40 business days of the complaint being received.

STAGE 3 – REVIEW AND DECISION

Once all information has been gathered, the complaint will be assessed and a decision will be issued. The CMRAO will issue a decision letter for every complaint received (both to the complainant and the licensee). The decision letter generally includes a summary of the allegations, details about the information gathering process, and the decision.

In handling complaints, the Registrar may do any of the following as appropriate:

  1. Attempt to mediate or resolve the complaint
  2. Give the licensee a written warning that if the licensee continues with the activity that led to the complaint, action may be taken against the licensee
  3. Require the Principal Condominium Manager of the licensee to take further educational courses if the licensee is a condominium management provider business
  4. Require the licensee to take further educational courses if the licensee is a condominium manager
  5. Refer the matter, in whole or in part, to the Discipline Committee
  6. Propose to suspend, revoke, or apply conditions to a licence
  7. Take further corrective action, in accordance with the Act

Proposals to suspend or revoke a licence are issued only in exceptional cases where the past or present conduct of the licensee affords reasonable grounds for the belief that the licensee will not perform the activities of a licensee in accordance with the law and with integrity and honesty.

Proposals to suspend, revoke or apply conditions to a licence are not final decisions. The licensee may appeal such proposals to the Licence Appeal Tribunal (LAT).

In some cases, matters may be referred to the Discipline Committee where the Registrar has formed the opinion that the licensee has committed a serious breach of the Code of Ethics.

If the Registrar refers the matter, in whole or in part, to the Discipline Committee, a panel of Committee members thoroughly examines and considers all evidence to determine if a licensee

has failed to comply with the Code of Ethics regulation. Decisions from this panel can be further appealed to the Appeals Committee.

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SERVICE STANDARDS:

  • The CMRAO will complete the Review and Decision Stage of the complaints process within 60 business days of the complaint being received.
 

SUBMIT A COMPLAINT

Complainants are required to fill out a complaint form on the CMRAO website, attaching any material, facts, or evidence to substantiate the claim. All submissions must be complete, and a clear and detailed statement of the allegation(s)must be provided. The complainant will receive an automated message confirming receipt of their submission with an assigned case file number.

Key components of the online form include:

  • Common data elements (name of manager, name of management company, name of complainant, etc.)
  • Summary of the complaint
  • Option to attach/upload documents to provide supporting evidence
  • The complainant must also agree to the CMRAO sharing all the information in their submission with the licensee(s)

Note: If the file size of your attachments exceeds the allowable limit, please proceed with the submission. Immediately after submitting the complaint, please respond directly to the automated confirmation email and indicate that you would like to submit additional documents. A CMRAO staff member will contact you within 5 business days and you will be able to make additional arrangements for collecting the relevant documentation.


Submit a Complaint